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4300 Harrison Blvd, Ste 5 Ogden, UT 84403
801-689-2244
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                  Puppy Vaccination Guidelines

6-8 Week Old

9-12 Weeks

Old

12-15 Weeks Old

16-19 Weeks Old

16 Months Old

Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza, Coronavirus

X

X

X

X

X

Every 1 to 3 thereafter pending of risk level

Bordetella (Kennel Cough) Intraoral or Intranasal

X

X

Annual

Rabies

X

X

Every 3 years if living in Utah. Each state may have different requirements

Leptospirosis

X

X

Annual

Influenza H3N2

X

X

X Annual. Recommended if traveling to states where outbreaks were document.

Rattle Snake Vaccine

X

X

Annual Recommended if dog is going to be exposed to rattle snake bites (ex. Hiking, camping, etc)

Deworming

x

x

x

Monthly Oral Deworming/Heartworm Preventative for life

Remember The Magic Date: 16 Weeks!

Puppy vaccines are EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to stimulate your pet’s immune system to produce antibodies (the “good guys”) to fight the viral antigens (the “bad guys”) like distemper, and parvovirus.

Timing is KEY to these early vaccines and here is why:

When puppies are born, their immune systems are weak. Puppies may obtain protection from their mother if she was properly vaccinated, through the consumption of “mother’s first milk” (colostrum). These antibodies, known as “maternal antibodies,” will help protect the puppy for the first few weeks of life and can may neutralize vaccines.

 As the maternal antibodies start to dwindle, the puppy’s immune system begins to respond to infectious agents within its environment. This means that the maternal antibodies may only last the puppy up to 16 weeks.

Because of this, we recommend vaccinating puppies at:

  • 8 weeks, 11 weeks, 14 weeks, and 17 weeks of age to ensure adequate protection and immune system development.

What if your puppy is older than 16 weeks and has not received any vaccines yet?

If your puppy is older than 16 weeks of age, we recommend 2 DA2PP vaccines 3-4 weeks apart to provide adequate protection. 

What about vaccines after the puppy shots?

Your dog will need a 1year booster of the DA2PP at 1-1 ½ years of age depending on when the last puppy vaccine was administered.  This is to ensure that your pet has an appropriate immune response when exposed to these infections. After the booster, your pet will then be placed on a 3-year protocol.

What about other vaccines?

RABIES –  Rabies must be given to your pet at 16 weeks of age, and then administered as a Rabies booster at 1-1 ½ years of age (for the same reasons as listed above for the DA2PP). After this booster, your pet will then be placed on a 3-year protocol. However, if you do not get the 1-year booster during the appropriate time interval or go beyond the 3-year interval, by law, we must start over with a 1 year protocol for your pet’s Rabies vaccine. 

Rabies is REQUIRED BY LAW.   Unless your pet is sick or has extenuating circumstances, every pet must be vaccinated for Rabies at our clinic.   

BORDETELLA – Bordetella is often known as the “Kennel Cough” vaccine.  Bordetella is one bacterial component that we can vaccinate your pet for in the “Kennel Cough” complex.  It is recommended to be administered yearly to maintain appropriate protection.  Bordetella is not required, but strongly recommended for any dogs who participate in “at risk” activities.  These activities include: hiking, visiting dog parks, boarding/kenneling, grooming, puppy daycare, traveling, and obedience/agility classes. 

LEPTOSPIROSIS: Leptospirosis is a disease caused by infection with Leptospira bacteria. These bacteria can be found worldwide in soil and water. There are many strains of Leptospira bacteria that can cause disease. Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, which means it can be spread from animals to people. Infection in people can cause flu-like symptoms and can cause liver or kidney disease.

In the United States, most cases of human leptospirosis result from recreational activities involving water. Infection resulting from contact with an infected pet is much less common, but it is possible.

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE: Any dog over 4 months of age that is exposed to rattlesnakes whether at home, walking, hiking, camping, hunting or elsewhere might be a good candidate for rattlesnake vaccine.

The first time your dog is vaccinated, we recommend an initial vaccine injection followed by a booster dose about one month later. We recommend then boostering each subsequent year.

Typically, boostering would involve a single dose at the start of the rattlesnake season in your area.

INTESTINAL WORMS: Puppies and kitties are more likely to be infected with intestinal parasites, which in turn can be passed to humans.

We strongly recommend deworming since 3 weeks of age and continue treatment every 2-3 weeks until 12 weeks when your pet will start taking a monthly deworming medication.

HEARTWORM Test: Puppies and dogs after the age of 1 year old. Recommendation heartworm testing every 2 years if your pet has been on heartworm medication once a month. Otherwise, we recommend once a year testing.

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal disease in pets. It is caused by foot-long worms (heartworms) that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected pets, causing severe lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs in the body. They are transmitted by mosquitoes.


Kitten Vaccination Guidelines

6-8 Week Old

10-12 Weeks

Old

14-16 Weeks Old

16 Months Old

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calicivirus (FVRCP)

X

X

X

X

Every 1 to 3 thereafter pending of risk level

Feline Leukemia

X

X

X

Annual if outdoors activity

Rabies

X

X

Every 3 years if living in Utah. Each state may have different requirements

Deworming

x

x

x

Every 6 months

Feline Leukemia/ FIV Testing

x

Remember The Magic Date: 14 Weeks!

Kitten vaccines are EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to stimulate your pet’s immune system to produce antibodies (the “good guys”) to fight the viral antigens (the “bad guys”) like herpes and other viruses. 

Timing is KEY to these early vaccines and here is why:

When kittens are born, their immune systems is weak. Kittens may obtain protection from their mother if she was properly vaccinated, through the consumption of “mother’s first milk” (colostrum). These antibodies, known as “maternal antibodies,” will help protect the kitten for the first few weeks of life and may neutralize vaccines.

 As the maternal antibodies start to dwindle, the kitten’s immune system begins to respond to infectious agents within its environment. This means that the maternal antibodies may only last the kitten up to 14 weeks.

Because of this, we recommend vaccinating kittens at:

  • 8 weeks, 11 weeks and 14 weeks of age to ensure adequate protection and immune system development.

What if your kitten is older than 14 weeks and has not received any vaccines yet?

If your cat is older than 16 weeks of age, we recommend 2 FVRCP and Feline Leukemia vaccines 3-4 weeks apart to provide adequate protection. 

What about vaccines after the kitten shots?

Your cat will need a 1-year booster of the FVRCP at 1-1 ½ years of age depending on when the last kitten vaccine was administered.  This is to ensure that your pet has an appropriate immune response when exposed to these infections. After the booster, your pet will then be placed on a 3 year protocol.

What about other vaccines?

RABIES –  Rabies must be given to your pet at 14-16 weeks of age, and then administered as a Rabies booster at 1-1 ½ years of age (for the same reasons as listed above for the FVRCP). 

After this booster, your pet will then be placed on a 3 year protocol. However, if you do not get the 1-year booster during the appropriate time interval or go beyond the 3-year interval, by law, we must start over with a 1 year protocol for your pet’s Rabies vaccine. 

 Rabies is REQUIRED BY LAW.   Unless your pet is sick or has extenuating circumstances, every pet must be vaccinated for Rabies at our clinic. 

  

INTESTINAL WORMS: Puppies and kittens are more likely to be infected with intestinal parasites, which in turn can be passed to humans.

We strongly recommend deworming since 3 weeks of age and continue treatment every 2-3 weeks until 12 weeks when your pet will start taking a monthly deworming medication.

Feline Leukemia and FIV Test: Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is contagious among cats. Unlike many other viruses that enter specific cells in the body and destroy them, FeLV enters certain cells in a cat’s body and changes the cells’ genetic characteristics. This permits FeLV to continue reproducing within the cat each time infected cells divide. This allows FeLV to become dormant (inactive) in some cats, making disease transmission and prognosis (outlook) difficult to predict.

Like FeLV, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is also contagious among cats, and a cat can be infected with FIV for many years without showing any clinical signs of illness. Although FIV is not contagious to humans, FIV has some similarities to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has been used to help researchers better understand HIV.

We recommend testing as soon as possible. The test is performed during your visit, it only takes 3 drops of blood and the results are ready in 10 minutes.

Veterinary Topics

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